2006-2007

Meeting of the University Senate


 

 

Meeting of the University Senate

Wednesday, March 14, 2007

Columbia 150, 3:00 – 5:00 p.m.

 

 

AGENDA

 

 

3:00      Call to order

 

3:05      1. Approval of the minutes of the February 14, 2007 meeting

 

3:10      2. State of the University

 

2.1  Remarks from Karen Sprague, Vice Provost for Undergraduate Studies

 

3:20      2.2 Questions, Responses, and Discussion

 

3:30      3. Reports

 

3.1 Athletics Department Annual Report – Bill Moos, Athletic Director

 

3:45      3.2 Winter 2007 Preliminary Curriculum Report – Paul Engelking, Chair,

Committee on Courses

 

4:00      3.3 OUS Advisory Committee on Retirement Plan Changes – Joe Stone, Larry

Dann

 

4:10      4. Announcements and Communications from the Floor

 

4:15      5. New Business

 

5. 1 Motion to rescind motion US06/07-7 passed January 10, 2007 concerning

timing of course evaluations – Bertram Malle, Psychology

 

4:25      5.2 Motion US06/07-12 to amend Resolution US00/01-4 regarding scheduling of athletic

events -- Jim O’Fallon and Cheyney Ryan

 

4:50      5.3 Resolution US06/07-13 to endorse IFS resolution to request OUS Provosts’

Council analysis of the College Now! Program—Peter Gilkey and John Nicols

 

5:00      Adjournment

 

 

 

 

Please note: times listed are approximate. For information regarding the University Senate's agendas, minutes, committees, and other matters, please visit http://senate.uoregon.edu/,. Meetings are open to all members of the university community and the public. 


Web page spun on 05 March 2007 by Peter B Gilkey 202 Deady Hall, Department of Mathematics at the University of Oregon, Eugene OR 97403-1222, U.S.A. Phone 1-541-346-4717 Email:peter.gilkey.cc.67@aya.yale.edu of Deady Spider Enterprises

Organizational Meeting of the University Senate>


Organizational Meeting of the University Senate
Wednesday May 23, 2007
 Browsing Room, Knight Library 3:00 to 4:30 p.m.

Agenda
Call to Order
3:05 1. Approval of the minutes from the May 9, 2007 meeting
3:10 2. Orientation

  •         2.1 Introduction of Newly Elected Senators - W. Andrew Marcus, Senate President
  • 3:20 2.2 Orientation to Senate Operations - Gwen Steigelman, Secretary of the Senate
3:30 3. Remarks
  •          3.1 Comments to the University Senate - Linda Brady, Provost
  • 3: 40 3.2 Reflections on the past year - W. Andrew Marcus, Outgoing Senate President
3:50 4. Organizational Business
  •         4.1 Motion to elect Committee on Committees - Gordon Sayre, Chair, Committee on Committees
  • 3:55 4.2 Nominations and election of Senate Vice President for 2007-2008
  • 4:05 4.3 Confirmation of 2007-2008 University Senate President Gordon Sayre
  •        4.4 Remarks from Senate President Gordon Sayre.
4:15 5. Presentations
  •         5.1 Presentation of the Wayne Westling Award for University Service and Leadership - awarded to Suzanne Clark, English; remarks by Senate President, Gordon Sayre
4:30 Adjournment

A welcome and congratulatory reception follows immediately after the Senate meeting in the Browsing Room of the Knight Library. 


Web page spun on 16 May 2007 at 17:16 by Peter B Gilkey 202 Deady Hall, Department of Mathematics at the University of Oregon, Eugene OR 97403-1222, U.S.A. Phone 1-541-346-4717 Email:peter.gilkey.cc.67@aya.yale.edu of Deady Spider Enterprises

Wednesday, October 11, 2006


 

Meeting of the University Senate

Columbia 150 3:00-5:00 p.m.

 

Agenda

 

 

Call to Order

 

3:05     Welcome – Senate President Jeanne Wagenknecht

 

3:10     1. Resignation of Senate President

                        1.1 Election of Senate President for 2006-2007,

            3:15                 1.2 Election of Senate Vice President for 2006-2007

            1.3 Approval of the minutes from May 24 and May 31, 2006 meetings

 

            3:20     2. State of the University Address

2.1 Remarks from University President Dave Frohnmayer

3:35                 2.2 Remarks from Provost Linda Brady

3:50                 2.3 Update on Campaign for Oregon -- Vice President Allan Price

4:05                 2.4 Update on Diversity Plan Implementation -- Vice Provost Charles

Martinez

 

4:20     3. Reports

3.1 Interinstitutional Faculty Senate – Representative John Nicols

 

            4. New Business

4:30                 4.1 Motion US06/07 – 1 to amend some wording in the University

Diversity Plan – Senator Peng Lu

4:45                 4.2 Notice of Motion to Amend US03/04 – 10 regarding lists of

Voting Faculty members – Frank Stahl

4:50                 4.3 Notice of Motion Opposing Military Action Against Iran – Senator

Ali Emami

 

Adjournment

 

Please note: times listed are approximate. For information regarding the University Senate's

agendas, minutes, committees, and other matters, please visit the Senate Web Page

http://senate.uoregon.edu/,. Meetings are open to all members of

the university community and the public.

 


Web page spun on 11 October 2006 by Peter B Gilkey 202 Deady Hall, Department of Mathematics at the University of Oregon, Eugene OR 97403-1222, U.S.A. Phone 1-541-346-4717 Email:peter.gilkey.cc.67@aya.yale.edu of Deady Spider Enterprises

Meeting of the University Senate


Meeting of the University Senate

Wednesday November 8, 2006

150 Columbia, 3:00-5:00 p.m.

 

Agenda

 

 

Call to Order

 

3:05        1.     Approval of Minutes of October 11, 2006 meeting

 

3:10        2.     State of the University

 

              2.1   Remarks from Vice President for Research Richard Linton

 

3:40        2.2   Proposed Changes to OUS Retirement and Benefit structures – Linda King,

Dave Frohnmayer or Linda Brady

 

4:10        3.     Reports

 

3.1   Annual Report on compliance with USA Patriot Act – Melinda Grier

 

4:15        4.     Announcements and Communications from the Floor

 

4:20        5.     New Business

 

5.1   Motion US06/07-2 Extend full senate membership to representatives

of classified Staff (motion withdrawn) – Nathan Tublitz

 

4:25        5.2   Motion US06/07-3 Amend US03/04-10 to organize voting faculty lists for

University Assembly petitioners – Frank Stahl

 

4:30        5.3   Motion US06/07-4 Opposing military action against Iran -- Ali Emami

 

4:50        5.4   Notice of Motion US06/07-5 to request that UO Affirmative Action Plans and summary

data made available on the web -- Peter Lambert

 

4:55        5.5   Notice of Motion US06/07-6 to establish a regular Senate Committee on Academic

Excellence -- Jeff Hurwit

 

5:00        Adjournment

 

 

 

Please note: times listed are approximate. For information regarding the University Senate's agendas, minutes, committees, and other matters, please visit http://senate.uoregon.edu/, Meetings are open to all members of the university community and the public. 

 


Web page spun on 29 October 2006 by Peter B Gilkey 202 Deady Hall, Department of Mathematics at the University of Oregon, Eugene OR 97403-1222, U.S.A. Phone 1-541-346-4717 Email:peter.gilkey.cc.67@aya.yale.edu of Deady Spider Enterprises

Meeting of the University Senate


Meeting of the University Senate

Wednesday, May 9, 2007

Columbia 150, 3:00 – 5:00 p.m.

 

AGENDA

 

 

3:00      Call to order

 

3:05      1. Approval of the minutes of the April 11, 2007 meeting

           

1.1 Remarks from spring term Senate President W. Andrew Marcus

 

3:10      2. State of the University

 

2.1 Remarks from President Dave Frohnmayer

 

3:15      2.2 Remarks from Provost Linda Brady

 

3:20      3. Reports

 

3.1 Senate Budget Committee – Chair, David Frank (Salary Comparison Data)

 

3:30      3.2 OUS Advisory Committee on Retirement Plan Changes – Larry

                   Dann

 

3:40      3.3 Academic Excellence Committee – Chair, Nathan Tublitz (see Goals)

 

3:50      3.4 Joint Senate/Academic Affairs Committee on Course Evaluations – Priscilla Southwell (Report)

 

4:00     3.5 Intercollegiate Athletics Committee Annual Report – Chair, Jim Isenberg

 

4:10      3.6 Spring 2007 Preliminary Curriculum Report – Paul Engelking, Chair,

Committee on Courses

 

4:18      4. Announcements and Communications from the Floor

 

4:20      5. New Business

 

5.1 Motion to confer degrees – Ken Calhoon, Chair, Academic Requirements Committee

 

4:22      5.2 Motion to Recommend 2007-08 Committee Appointments – Gordon Sayre, Chair, Committee on Committees

 

4:25     5.3 Motion US06/07-15 on methods and procedures for awarding degrees to persons who were ordered evacuated to internment camps in 1942 – Peter Gilkey

 

4:45      5.4 Motion US06/07-14 on scheduling restrictions for football games during weekdays and final exams period – Nathan Tulbitz 

 

5:00      Adjournment

 

Please note: times listed are approximate. For information regarding the University Senate's agendas, minutes, committees, and other matters, please visit http://senate.uoregon.edu/,. Meetings are open to all members of the university community and the public. 

 


The following information was made available on the main Senate Web Page. It is added here for archival purposes:
  • Links to documents being considered at the 9 May Senate Meeting:
  • Motion to confer degrees
  • US06/07-14 Scheduling restrictions for football games during weekdays and final exams period
  • US06/07-15 Methods and procedures for awarding degrees to persons who were ordered evacuated to internment camps in 1942
  • Spring Curriculum report.
  • COC report
  • Annual report of the IAC
  • Salary Comparison Data from the SBC
  • Report from the Joint Senate-Academic Affairs Committee on Student Evaluations
  • Report from the Senate Committee on Academic Excellence (9 May 2007):
    • Campaign for excellence in teaching and research (30 November 2006)
    • Excellence and access: promoting and safeguarding the mission of the University of Oregon (30 November 2006)
    • Specific goals to improve academic quality (9 May 2007)
  • Information from Larry Dann concerning the OUS Retirement options

Web page spun on 10 May 2007 by Peter B Gilkey 202 Deady Hall, Department of Mathematics at the University of Oregon, Eugene OR 97403-1222, U.S.A. Phone 1-541-346-4717 Email:peter.gilkey.cc.67@aya.yale.edu of Deady Spider Enterprises

Meeting of the University Senate Wednesday, January 10, 2007 Columbia 150, 3:00 - 5:00 p.m.

Meeting of the University Senate
Wednesday, January 10, 2007
Columbia 150, 3:00 - 5:00 p.m.


  • 3:00 Call to order
  • 3:05 1. Approval of the minutes of the November 29, 2006 meeting
  • 3:10 2. State of the University
  •          2.1 Remarks from President Dave Frohnmayer
  • 3:30 2.2 Remarks from Provost Linda Brady
  • 3:50 3. Reports
  •          3.1 OUS Advisory Committee on Retirement Plan Changes - Joe Stone , UO representative
  • 3:55 3.2 Senate Budget Committee - David Frank, chair
  • 4:15 4. Announcements and Communications from the Floor
        4.1 Joint Senate/Academic Affairs Ad hoc Committee on Faculty and Course Evaluations
  • 4:20 5. New Business
  •         5.1 Motion US06/07-7 - Timing of On-line course evaluations - Brad Shelton, Mathematics
  • 4:40 5.2 Motion US06/07-8 - Revise procedures for honorary degrees - Dave Hubin, chair, Distinguished Service Award Committee. See also a comparision of the old versus the new wording -- amends the 22 May 1991 legislation.
  • 4:50 5.3 Notice of Motion regarding eligibility for senate vice president position -- Andrew Marcus, Senate Executive Committee
  • 4:55 5.4 Notice of Motions regarding University Assembly enabling and meeting legislation -- Frank Stahl, biology emeritus
  • 5:00 Adjournment


Please note: times listed are approximate. For information regarding the University Senate's agendas, minutes, committees, and other matters, please visit the Senate Web Page http://senate.uoregon.edu/. Meetings are open to all members of the university community and the public. 


Web page spun on 20 December 2006 by Peter B Gilkey 202 Deady Hall, Department of Mathematics at the University of Oregon, Eugene OR 97403-1222, U.S.A. Phone 1-541-346-4717 Email:peter.gilkey.cc.67@aya.yale.edu of Deady Spider Enterprises

Agenda for the UO Senate Meeting 11 April 2007


Meeting of the University Senate
Wednesday, April 11, 2007
Columbia 150, 3:00 - 5:00 p.m.


AGENDA


  • 3:00 Call to order
  • 3:05 1. Approval of the minutes of the March 14, 2007 meeting
    • 1.1 Remarks from Spring term Senate President W. Andrew Marcus
  • 3:15 2. State of the University
    •         2.1 Remarks from President Dave Frohnmayer
    • 3:25 2.2 Remarks from Provost Linda Brady
  • 3:40 3. Reports
    •         3.1 Athletic Department Annual Report -- Athletic Department Representative
    • 3:55 3.2 Remarks - UO Athletic Director Pat Kilkenny
  • 4:25 4. Announcements and Communications from the Floor
  • 4:30 5. New Business
    • 5.1 Motion US06/07-11 to expand criteria for officers-of-instruction who may serve as University Senate Vice President and President -- Senate Executive Committee
  • 5:00 Adjournment

Please note: times listed are approximate. For information regarding the University Senate's agendas, minutes, committees, and other matters, please visit http://senate.uoregon.edu/,. Meetings are open to all members of the university community and the public. 
Web page spun on 6 April 2007 by Peter B Gilkey 202 Deady Hall, Department of Mathematics at the University of Oregon, Eugene OR 97403-1222, U.S.A. Phone 1-541-346-4717 Email:peter.gilkey.cc.67@aya.yale.edu of Deady Spider Enterprises

Johnson Committee Report 2007

MEMO TO: Gwen Steigelman (Secretary of the UO University Senate)
Andrew Marcus (President of the UO University Senate)
Gordon Sayre (Vice President of the UO Senate)

MEMO FROM: Peter Gilkey (Chair Johnson Committee 2006/7)

MEMO RE: Final report of the Johnson Committee

DATE: 24 April 2007

Dear Andrew, Gordon, and Gwen:

Senate Legislation requires a report by each committee chair of a standing University Committee to the Senate on an annual basis. It is my honor and priviledge to make such a report to you as chair of the Johnson committee for 2006/7.

The committee met once, considered the documentation provided for the nominee(s), and forwarded the name of a nominee with a favorable recommendation to the President of the University of Oregon as specified in the enabling legislation of the committee.

The committee recommended that the returning members of the committee for 2007/8 act proactively to seek nominations for the Johnson Award next year. In particular, we decided to contact the Deans of the various schools and colleges and ask them to transmit information concerning the nomination process for a Johnson Award to their department heads together with a request for appropriate action. We hope thereby to spread the net as widely as possible next year.

Respectfully submitted

Peter B Gilkey
Chair (2006/7) Johnson Committee

House Bill 2823

This information is taken from http://www.leg.state.or.us/searchmeas.html

Legislative History as of 17 April 2007



HB 2823 By Representatives CLEM, KOTEK; Representatives BUCKLEY, GREENLICK, HUNT -- Relating to internment camps.
03/01 (H) First reading. Referred to Speaker's desk.
03/05 (H) Referred to Education.
03/23 (H) Public Hearing and Work Session held.
03/27 (H) Recommendation: Do pass with amendments and be printed A-Engrossed.
03/29 (H) Second reading.
04/02 (H) Third reading. Carried by Kotek, Clem. Passed. Ayes, 56; Excused, 4--Boone, Esquivel, Read, Witt.
04/03 (S) First reading. Referred to President's desk.
04/05 (S) Referred to Education and General Government.
05/01 (S) Public Hearing and Work Session held.
05/03 (S) Recommendation: Do pass the A-Eng. bill.
05/03 (S) Second reading.
05/04 (S) Third reading. Carried by Metsger. Passed. Ayes, 27; Excused, 3--Gordly, Prozanski, Winters.
05/23 (H) Speaker signed.
05/24 (S) President signed.
05/31 (H) Governor signed.

As amended


        74th OREGON LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY--2007 Regular Session

NOTE:  Matter within  { +  braces and plus signs + } in an
amended section is new. Matter within  { -  braces and minus
signs - } is existing law to be omitted. New sections are within
 { +  braces and plus signs + } .

LC 3452

                           A-Engrossed

                         House Bill 2823
                  Ordered by the House March 27
            Including House Amendments dated March 27

Sponsored by Representatives CLEM, KOTEK; Representative BUCKLEY


                             SUMMARY

The following summary is not prepared by the sponsors of the
measure and is not a part of the body thereof subject to
consideration by the Legislative Assembly. It is an editor's
brief statement of the essential features of the measure.

  Allows state institution of higher education to award  { +
honorary + } post-secondary degree to person ordered to
internment camp if certain qualifications are met.

                        A BILL FOR AN ACT
Relating to internment camps.
Be It Enacted by the People of the State of Oregon:
  SECTION 1.  { + (1) As used in this section, 'internment camp '
means a relocation center to which persons were ordered evacuated
by Presidential Executive Order 9066, signed on February 19,
1942.
  (2) A person who meets the requirements of subsection (4) of
this section may request a state institution of higher education
listed in ORS 352.002 to award the person an honorary
post-secondary degree.
  (3) A representative of a deceased person who meets the
requirements of subsection (4) of this section may request a
state institution of higher education listed in ORS 352.002 to
award an honorary post-secondary degree on behalf of the deceased
person.
  (4) Notwithstanding the requirements for a post-secondary
degree established by a state institution of higher education or
by the State Board of Higher Education, a state institution of
higher education that receives a request under subsection (2) or
(3) of this section may award an honorary post-secondary degree
to a person, or on behalf of a deceased person, who:
  (a) Was a student at the state institution of higher education
in 1942; and
  (b) Did not graduate from the institution because the person
was ordered to an internment camp. + }
----------

As introduced


        74th OREGON LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY--2007 Regular Session

NOTE:  Matter within  { +  braces and plus signs + } in an
amended section is new. Matter within  { -  braces and minus
signs - } is existing law to be omitted. New sections are within
 { +  braces and plus signs + } .

LC 3452

                         House Bill 2823

Sponsored by Representatives CLEM, KOTEK; Representative BUCKLEY


                             SUMMARY

The following summary is not prepared by the sponsors of the
measure and is not a part of the body thereof subject to
consideration by the Legislative Assembly. It is an editor's
brief statement of the essential features of the measure as
introduced.

  Allows state institution of higher education to award
post-secondary degree to person ordered to internment camp if
certain qualifications are met.

                        A BILL FOR AN ACT
Relating to internment camps.
Be It Enacted by the People of the State of Oregon:
  SECTION 1.  { + (1) As used in this section, 'internment camp '
means a relocation center to which persons were ordered evacuated
by Presidential Executive Order 9066, signed on February 19,
1942.
  (2) A person who meets the requirements of subsection (4) of
this section may request a state institution of higher education
listed in ORS 352.002 to award the person a post-secondary
degree.
  (3) A representative of a deceased person who meets the
requirements of subsection (4) of this section may request a
state institution of higher education listed in ORS 352.002 to
award a post-secondary degree on behalf of the deceased person.
  (4) Notwithstanding the requirements for a post-secondary
degree established by a state institution of higher education or
by the State Board of Higher Education, a state institution of
higher education that receives a request under subsection (2) or
(3) of this section may award a post-secondary degree to a
person, or on behalf of a deceased person, who:
  (a) Was a student at the state institution of higher education
in 1942; and
  (b) Did not graduate from the institution because the person
was ordered to an internment camp. + }
                         ----------

Web page spun on 6 May 2007 by Peter B Gilkey 202 Deady Hall, Department of Mathematics at the University of Oregon, Eugene OR 97403-1222, U.S.A. Phone 1-541-346-4717 Email:peter.gilkey.cc.67@aya.yale.edu of Deady Spider Enterprises

NEW COURSES


FINAL SPRING 2007 CURRICULUM REPORT

Passed, as amended, by the University Senate on May 9, 2007

 

OVERVIEW

 

The body of this report consists of two major sections: Course Proposals reviewed spring 2007 and Other Curricular Matters. Policies and definitions governing group and multicultural general-education requirements are under Other Curricular Matters.

 

Course proposals approved by both the University of Oregon Committee on Courses (UOCC) and the University Senate are effective fall term 2007, unless a specific term is requested by an academic department and stated otherwise in this report.

 

The UOCC will consider new proposals during fall term and will submit a fall quarterly report to the University Senate in November 2007.

 

Routing of Minor Changes: The UOCC has confirmed that the following minor course changes may be made without review by the full committee: minor edits of course description, pre- or corequisites, grading option, and conditions of repeatability. Changes may be submitted in writing directly to the Office of the Registrar and Creative Publishing, in care of Mike Jefferis (jefferis@uoregon.edu) and Scott Skelton (sskelton@uoregon.edu). The memorandum should indicate the effective term for the change(s). Note: extensive changes may be referred to the UOCC for review.

 

Courses Not Taught Report: The UOCC has changed the policy of dropping courses not taught within the past three years from the fall curriculum report to the spring curriculum report. This allows the correct listing of courses in the catalog for the following curricular year. The intention for this change is to allow departments a chance to reply earlier and provide a more thoughtful response while still involved in curricular planning and staffing for the next academic year and can best determine which courses they are able to offer.

 

Multicultural Courses Policy: As part of general-education, offerings of multicultural courses at the 100, 200, and 300 levels need to be available to a wide spectrum of students from all across the University. Departments wishing to offer courses to satisfy the multicultural requirement should make such these courses available at the more general 100, 200, or 300 levels whenever possible, rather than at the more specialized 400 level.

 

Extended Course Descriptions for Group Satisfying Courses: All proposals for courses that would satisfy a group requirement for general-education must include a suitable extended course description, for use with the course, as specified in senate legislation:

 

“For all group-satisfying courses to be offered during a particular term, faculty or departments are asked to post electronically, in the Schedule of Classes, course descriptions that are substantially expanded over those provided in the catalog. The posted course information should be understandable to someone unfamiliar with the field and should emphasize the questions or issues that reveal, by their breadth and significance, why the course has earned Group status.” (US03/04-8, May 12, 2004)


 

LOOKING AHEAD

 

July 2007:                  Publication of 2007–8 University of Oregon Catalog. The changes in the fall report will first appear in this catalog.

September 12, 2007:    Curricular proposals for consideration in the fall round must be submitted to the provost’s office.

November 28, 2007:     University Senate considers fall 2007 preliminary report of the University of Oregon Committee on Courses.

December 19, 2007:     Curricular proposals for consideration in the winter round must be submitted to the provost’s office.

March 12, 2008:          University Senate considers winter 2008 preliminary report of the University of Oregon Committee on Courses.

March 19, 2008:          Curricular proposals for consideration in the spring round must be submitted to the provost’s office.

May 14, 2008:             University Senate considers spring 2008 preliminary report of the University of Oregon Committee on Courses.

 

 

Members, University of Oregon Committee on Courses

 

Voting:       Paul Engelking, Chair                        Ex officio:        Jack Bennett

                  Jack Boss                                                                Herb Chereck

                  Emma Martin                                                          John Crosiar

                  Paul Peppis                                                             Marian Friestad

                  Arkady Vaintrob                                                      Scott Skelton      

                  Frances White

                                                                                              

Student:      None                                               Staff:               Linda Adkins

                                                                                               Miriam Bolton

                                                                                               Mike Jefferis


Motion

 

The University of Oregon Committee on Courses moves that the following course proposals and Other Curricular Matters be approved.

 

Unless indicated otherwise, courses may be taken either pass/no pass or for letter grades. “P/N only” or “graded only” indicates that all students must take the course as specified in the bold print. Separate grading options for majors are bracketed in this report and appear in UO class schedule notes; they are not printed in the UO Catalog. R after course credits means that the course number may be repeated for credit. “Sequence” after the description means the courses must be taken in numerical order.

College of Arts and Sciences

 

Computer and Information Science

 

NEW COURSES

 

(Course previously taught as 399)

CIS 330 C/C++ and Unix (4) Practical software design and programming activities in a C/C++ and Unix environment, with emphasis on the details of C/C++ and good programming style and practices. Prereq: CIS 313, 323.

 

(Course previously taught as 410/510)

CIS 453/553 Data Mining (4) Databases, machine learning, artificial intelligence, statistics, and data visualization. Examines data warehouses, data preprocessing, association and classification rule mining, and cluster analysis. Prereq: CIS 451/551.

 

(Course previously taught as 610)

CIS 640 Writing in Computer Research (2) Students learn to provide and accept constructive criticism of writing samples in a workshop format.

 

Dean’s Office

 

NEW COURSES

 

ARB 201 Second-Year Arabic (5) Development of Arabic speaking, reading, writing, and comprehension; study of short literary and cultural materials. Sequence with ARB 202, 203. Prereq: ARB 103 or equivalent. Approved to satisfy Group I: Arts and Letters general-education group requirement.

 

ARB 202 Second-Year Arabic (5) Development of Arabic speaking, reading, writing, and comprehension; study of short literary and cultural materials. Sequence with ARB 201, 203. Prereq: ARB 201 or equivalent. Approved to satisfy Group I: Arts and Letters general-education group requirement.

 

ARB 203 Second-Year Arabic (5) Development of Arabic speaking, reading, writing, and comprehension; study of short literary and cultural materials. Sequence with ARB 201, 202. Prereq: ARB 202 or equivalent. Approved to satisfy Group I: Arts and Letters general-education group requirement.


 

East Asian Languages and Literatures

 

NEW COURSES

 

CHN 381 City in Chinese Literature and Film (4) [Graded only for majors] Examines urbanization and urban culture in Chinese literature and film. Instruction in Chinese. Sequence with CHN 380. Prereq: fluency in spoken and written Chinese. Offered alternate years. Approved to satisfy Group I: Arts and Letters general-education group requirement and Category C: International Cultures multicultural requirement.

 

(Course previously taught as EALL 399)

KRN 301 Third-Year Korean (5) Develops advanced language skills in Korean with focus on literary and cultural texts, writing, and oral skills. Sequence with KRN 302, 303. Prereq: KRN 203. Approved to satisfy Group I: Arts and Letters general-education group requirement.

 

(Course previously taught as EALL 399)

KRN 302 Third-Year Korean (5) Develops advanced language skills in Korean with focus on literary and cultural texts, writing, and oral skills. Sequence with KRN 301, 303. Prereq: KRN 301. Approved to satisfy Group I: Arts and Letters general-education group requirement.

 

(Course previously taught as EALL 399)

KRN 303 Third-Year Korean (5) Develops advanced language skills in Korean with focus on literary and cultural texts, writing, and oral skills. Sequence with KRN 301, 302. Prereq: KRN 302. Approved to satisfy Group I: Arts and Letters general-education group requirement.

 

English

 

NEW COURSES

 

(Course previously taught as ENG 199)

ENG 110 Introduction to Film and Media (4) [Graded only for majors] Basic critical approaches to film and media studies. Analysis and interpretation of film and media. Approved to satisfy Group I: Arts and Letters general-education group requirement.

 

ENG 380 Film, Media, and History (4) [Graded only for majors] Study of the history of institutions and industries that shape production and reception of film and media. Approved to satisfy Group I: Arts and Letters general-education group requirement.

 

ENG 381 Film, Media, and Culture (4) [Graded only for majors] Study of film and media as aesthetic objects that engage with communities identified by class, gender, race, ethnicity, and sexuality. Approved to satisfy Group I: Arts and Letters general-education group requirement. Approved to satisfy Category B: Identity, Pluralism and Tolerance multicultural requirement.

 

(Course previously taught as ENG 410/510)

ENG 412/512 Literary Editing (4) [Graded only for majors] Study of principles and practices of editing contemporary literature. Includes observation of editorial activities at Northwest Review.

 

(Course previously taught as ENG 399)

ENG 485/585 Television Studies (4) [Graded only for majors] Study of television’s institutional contents and representational practices, including such television genres as serials, news, and reality TV. Offered alternate years.

 

(Course previously taught as ENG 481/581)

ENG 486/586 New Media and Digital Culture (4) [Graded only for majors] Study of media emerging from computer-based and digital techniques, including digital cinema, cyborgs, interactive games, multiplayer online simulations, and viral videos. Offered alternate years.

 

Geological Sciences

 

(Correction from winter term 2007)

(Course number change)

GEOL 474/574 General and Environmental Geochemistry (4) [Graded only for majors] Lecture- and project-based introduction to geochemical classification of elements, element cycling, trace element geochemistry, geochemistry of surface environments, basics of radiogenic, and stable isotope geochemistry. Prereq: CHEM 221, 222, 223; GEOL 311 or 332.

 

(UOCC Administrative Action)

(Changed Course Description)

GEOL 619 Electron Beam Analysis (4) Electron probe microanalysis and scanning electron microscopy for analyzing minerals and advances materials. Instrumental functions and beam-specimen interaction. Correction procedures for quantitative x-ray analysis. X-ray and back-scattered image analysis.

 

History

 

NEW COURSES

 

(Course previously taught as 399)

HIST 393 Samurai in Film (4) Examination of the image of Japan’s warrior class, the most prominent social group in Japan for over seven centuries. Combines films, readings, and lectures. Approved to satisfy Group II: Social Science general-education group requirement. Approved to satisfy Category C: International Cultures multicultural requirement.

 

(Course previously taught as 410)

HIST 437/537 Medieval Spain (4) [Graded only for majors] A study of two related aspects of medieval Iberian history: Spain as a frontier society and Spain as a multicultural, multireligious society.

 

(Course previously taught as 410/510)

HIST 493/593 Japanese History through Film: [Topic] (4R) Examination of issues of personal identity and choice in selected periods of Japanese history, with emphasis on individual and group responses to transition and social change. R when topic changes. Offered alternate years. DENIED the request for this course satisfy Category B: Identity, Pluralism and Tolerance multicultural requirement.

 

Philosophy

 

NEW COURSES

 

PHIL 430 Chinese Philosophy: [Topic] (4R) Survey of significant traditions, thinkers, or topics in Chinese philosophy. Prereq: PHIL 213 or REL 302. R when topic changes. Offered alternate years.

 

PHIL 630 Chinese Philosophy: [Topic] (4R) Pursues advanced questions in Chinese philosophy by concentrating on a particular tradition, thinker, or topic. R when topic changes Offered alternate years.

 

Romance Languages

 

NEW COURSES

 

PORT 201 Second-Year Portuguese (5) Development of Brazilian Portuguese speaking, reading, writing, and comprehension; study of short literary and cultural materials. Sequence with PORT 202, 203. Prereq: PORT 103 or equivalent. Approved to satisfy Group I: Arts and Letters general-education group requirement.

 

 

PORT 202 Second-Year Portuguese (5) Development of Brazilian Portuguese speaking, reading, writing, and comprehension; study of short literary and cultural materials. Sequence with PORT 201, 203. Prereq: PORT 201 or equivalent. Approved to satisfy Group I: Arts and Letters general-education group requirement.

 

PORT 203 Second-Year Portuguese (5) Development of Brazilian Portuguese speaking, reading, writing, and comprehension; study of short literary and cultural materials. Sequence with PORT 201, 202. Prereq: PORT 202 or equivalent. Approved to satisfy Group I: Arts and Letters general-education group requirement.

 

 

PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES

 

School of Architecture and Allied Arts

 

Art

 

OLD COURSES DROPPED

 

ART 380 Calligraphy (4)

ART 414/514 Art and Creativity (3)

ARTC 459/559 Advanced Studio Forum (4)

ARTD 477/577 Multimedia Design I (5)

ARTO 694 Graduate Studies in Photography (3)

ARTS 287 Sculpture I: Metal Fabrication (3)

 

EXISTING COURSE CHANGES

 

ARTD 250 Digital Arts I (4)

(Changed Course Description, Course Title)

ARTD 250 Print Media Digital Arts

Examines application of print media in contemporary visual culture; explores its use in a fine art context. Introduces digital drawing, digital photo editing, and typographic layout to visually communicate expressive concepts. Laboratories, lectures.

 

ARTD 251 Digital Arts II (4)

(Changed Course Description, Course Title)

ARTD 251 Time-Based Digital Arts

Explores the notion of time as a medium in relation to contemporary art through which concepts of sequence, narration, scoring, and motion are expressed. Laboratories, lectures.

 

ARTD 252 Digital Arts III (4)

(Changed Course Description, Course Title)

ARTD 252 Interactive Digital Arts Introduces resources that the computer offers the artist. Concentrates on animation, interaction, and the web as expressive mediums. Laboratories, lectures.

 

ARTP 490/590 Advanced Painting (5)

(Changed Course Title, Credits-Workload)

ARTP 490/590 Issues and Practices in Painting (3–5R) Intensive critique, discussion, readings, and presentations.

 

ARTS 288 Sculpture I: Materials and Structures (3-5R)

(Changed Course Description, Course Title, Repeatability)

ARTS 288 Sculpture I: Mixed Media (3–5R) Investigation of 3-D forms in space using a range of processes. R when topic changes.

 

NEW COURSES

 

ART 405 Reading and Conference: [Topic] (1–6R) Independent reading and research course. R when topic changes.

 

ARTC 490/590 Issues and Practices in Ceramics (3–5R) Intensive critique, discussion, readings, and presentations. Prereq: B.F.A. or M.F.A. standing.

 

(Course previously taught as ARTD 477/577)

ARTD 378 Multimedia Design I (5R) Introduces multimedia design and authoring; use of motion, duration, and time-based interaction as a means of artistic expression. Students build navigational structures and explore stochastic principles in developing an individual approach to interactivity. Sequence with ARTD 478/578. Prereq: ARTD 394.

 

(Course previously taught as 410/510)

ARTD 416/516 Programming for Artists (4R) Introduces students to the basics of computer programming within an art context. Topics include interaction design, web development, and physical computing programming.

 

(Course previously taught as 408/608)

ARTD 490/590 Issues and Practices in Digital Arts (1–5R) Intensive critique, discussion, readings, and presentations. Prereq: B.F.A. or M.F.A. standing.

 

ARTF 356 Intermediate Fibers (4–5R) Further explores weaving techniques, builds technical and critique skills, develops visual expression, and strengthens the conceptual framework. Content varies by term. Prereq: ARTF 267. R as topic changes.

 

(Course previously taught as ARTF 408/508)

ARTF 490/590 Issues and Practices in Fibers (3–5R) Intensive critique, discussion, readings, and presentations. Prereq: B.F.A. or M.F.A. standing.

 

(Course previously taught as ARTM 408/508)

ARTM 490/590 Issues and Practices in Metals (3–5R) Intensive critique, discussion, readings, and presentations. Prereq: B.F.A. or M.F.A. standing.

 

(Course previously taught as ARTO 694)

ARTO 490/590 Issues and Practices in Photography (3–5R) Intensive critique, discussion, readings, and presentations. Prereq: B.F.A. or M.F.A. standing.

 

(Course previously taught as ARTR 405/508)

ARTR 490/590 Issues and Practices in Printmaking (3–5R) Intensive critique, discussion, readings, and presentations. Prereq: B.F.A. or M.F.A. standing.

 

(Course previously taught as ARTS 408/508)

ARTS 490/590 Issues and Practices in Sculpture (3–5R) Intensive critique, discussion, readings, and presentations. Prereq: B.F.A. or M.F.A. standing.

 

College of Education

 

Counseling Psychology and Human Services

 

OLD COURSES DROPPED

 

FHS 601 Research (1R)

FHS 605 Reading and Conference (1R)

FHS 606 Field Studies (1R)

 

FHS 607 Seminar (1R)

FHS 608 Workshop (1R)

FHS 609 Practicum (1R)

FHS 610 Experimental Course (1R)

 

Lundquist College of Business

 

Accounting

 

EXISTING COURSE CHANGES

 

(UOCC Administrative Action)

ACTG 406 Special Problems: [Topic] (1–4) P/NP only

ACTG 407 Seminar: [Topic] (4) P/NP only

 

Business Administration

 

 

(UOCC Administrative Action)

BA 404 Internship: [Topic] (1) P/NP only

BA 407 Seminar: [Topic] (1–4) P/NP only

 

Decision Sciences

 

EXISTING COURSE CHANGES

 

(UOCC Administrative Action)

DSC 406 Special Problems: [Topic] (1–4) P/NP only

DSC 407 Seminar: [Topic] (1–4) P/NP only

 

Finance

 

EXISTING COURSE CHANGES

 

(UOCC Administrative Action)

FIN 406 Special Problems: [Topic] (1–4) P/NP only

FIN 407 Seminar: [Topic] (4) P/NP only

 

 

Management

 

EXISTING COURSE CHANGES

 

(UOCC Administrative Action)

MGMT 406 Special Problems: [Topic] (1–4) P/NP only

MGMT 407 Seminar: [Topic] (4) P/NP only


 

Marketing

 

EXISTING COURSE CHANGES

 

(UOCC Administrative Action)

MKTG 406 Special Problems: [Topic] (1–4) P/NP only

MKTG 407 Seminar: [Topic] (4) P/NP only

 

SportS Business

 

EXISTING COURSE CHANGES

 

(UOCC Administrative Action)

SBUS 406 Special Problems: [Topic] (4) P/NP only

SBUS 407 Seminar: [Topic] (4) P/NP only

 

Physical Activity and Recreation Services

 

EXISTING COURSE CHANGES

 

PEF 310 Nutrition and Performance (2)

(Changed credits)

PEF 310 Nutrition and Performance (3)

 

School of Music and Dance

 

Music

 

 

NEW COURSES

 

(Course previously taught as MUS 607 in 200503)

MUS 629 Repertoire and Analysis (3R) [Graded only for majors] Analytical interpretations of musical works in a context that focuses on repertoire rather than on particular analytical methodologies. The pieces studied vary each time the course is offered. R with varying repertoire.


 

Other Curricular Matters

 

The following information is not provided for approval by the University Senate. It is to inform academic and administrative departments about the status of proposals received but not approved by the UO Committee on Courses during spring term 2007.

 

College of Education

 

A name change has been approved for the Department of Special Education to change its name to the Department of Special Education and Clinical Sciences. Effective July 1, 2007.

 

Physical activity and recreation services

 

Physical Activities and Recreation Services (PARS) has received approval to change its name to the Department of Physical Education and Recreation. Effective July 1, 2007.

 

DENIED PROPOSALS

 

Art

 

(Course previously taught as 408)

ART 308 Technical Workshop: [topic] (1-3R) topics change every term. If link to syllabus is not available, contact instructor by e-mail. Prereq: none R change of topic The UOCC determined the title change was unnecessary. Registrar’s office will work with Art Dept to discuss options to manage degree audit.

 

PENDING PROPOSALS

 

All the Teacher Education proposals listed below are pending. The UOCC has noted several of the syllabi are incomplete and there is a need further clarification on the College of Education’s request.

 

Teacher Education

 

NEW COURSES

 

EDST 220 Beginning Applications in Educational Technology (4) [Graded only for majors] Learn a variety of skills as well as computer applications useful for communicating in an educational setting.

 

EDST 221 Advanced Applications in Educational Technology (4) [Graded only for majors] Introduction to using web-based tools and applications for a variety of school activities.

 

EDST 230 Integrated Science for Elementary Educators (4) [Graded only for majors] Students participate in integrated science lessons that model active engagement in the process of scientific discovery.

 

EDST 331 Learning, Teaching and Assessment 1 (4) [Graded only for majors] Through critical autobiographies, case studies, readings and application activities, students will examine and reflect on life in classrooms. Sequence: EDST 332, EDST 333

 

 

EDST 332 Learning, Teaching and Assessment 2 (4) [Graded only for majors] Students move beyond their own critical autobiographies of life in classrooms into various disciplinary literatures on learning, teaching and assessment. Sequence: EDST 331,333 Prereq: EDST 331Co-req: EDST 338

 

EDST 333 Learning, Teaching and Assessment 3 (4) [Graded only for majors] Focus on specific school subjects that will provide a context for examining the basic assumptions underlying teaching, learning, and assessment. Sequence: EDST 331, EDST 332 Prereq: Pre-req: EDST 332Co-req: EDST 339

 

EDST 338 Observation: Learning, Teaching, Assessment 2 (1) [Graded only for majors] Students focus on listening to children to better understand how they make sense of school subjects. Prereq: Co-Req: EDST 332

 

EDST 339 Observation: Learning, Teaching, Assessment 3 (1) [Graded only for majors] Focus on developing skills in observing instances of learning, teaching and assessments. Prereq: Co-req: EDST 333

 

EDST 341 Curriculum Studies 1 (4) [Graded only for majors] Engages students in a critical examination of the sources and content of their learning both inside and outside of schools. Sequence: EDST 342, EDST 343

 

EDST 342 Curriculum Studies 2 (4) [Graded only for majors] Examine basic assumptions underlying curriculum in specific subject areas. Sequence: EDST 341, EDST 343 Prereq: Pre-req: EDST 341Co-req: EDST 348

 

EDST 343 Curriculum Studies 3 (4) [Graded only for majors] Examine basic assumptions underlying curriculum development in K-12 schools. Sequence: EDST 341,342 Prereq: Pre-req: EDST 342Co-req: EDST 349

 

EDST 348 Observation: Curriculum Studies 2 (1) [Graded only for majors] Students observe classrooms to examine real examples of curriculum in practice. Prereq: Co-req: EDST 342

 

EDST 349 Observation: Curriculum Studies 3 (1) [Graded only for majors] Students will observe the global and ideological dimensions of curriculum Prereq: Co-req: EDST 343

 

EDST 411 Childhood Studies (4) [Graded only for majors] Examines child development from within the context of specific development and ecological theories.

 

EDST 412 Adolescent Studies (4) [Graded only for majors] Introduces critical concepts of adolescence relevant to teaching and learning.

 

EDST 421/521 Technology Education: Chalkboards to Computers (4) [Graded only for majors] Critically examine the integration of technology in schools and other settings. Sequence: EDST 422/522

 

EDST 422/522 Technology Education: Teachers as Cyborgs (4) [Graded only for majors] An in-depth examination of educational technology, including the theoretical, methodological, practical and policy issues that influence the field. Sequence: EDST 421/521 Prereq: Pre-req: EDST 421/521Co-req: EDST 429/529

 

EDST 429/529 Observation: Technology Education (1) [Graded only for majors] Students observe instructional technology in practice and consider the intended and unintended effects of using computers in a particular learning setting. Prereq: Co-req: EDST 422/522

 

EDST 451 Living in a Stratified Society (4) [Graded only for majors] A critical examination of the stratification of wealth, status, and opportunity for advancement in our society. Prereq: Co-req: EDST 459

 

EDST 452/552 Equal Opportunity: Poverty (4) [Graded only for majors] Examines the way poverty structures and mediates educational experiences and influences the educational achievement of students. Prereq: Pre-req: EDST 451

 

EDST 453/553 Equal Opportunity: Racism (4) [Graded only for majors] A critical examination of the historical development of the concept of “race”‘ and its role in legitimizing colonization, genocide, and extreme maldistributions of wealth. Prereq: Pre-req: EDST 451

 

 

EDST 454/554 Equal Opportunity: Patriarchy (4) [Graded only for majors] Examines the way gender mediates educational experiences and influences the educational achievement of students. Prereq: Pre-req: EDST 451

 

EDST 455/555 Equal Opportunity: Homophobia (4) [Graded only for majors] Examines the way sexuality and sexual identity influences the educational experiences of students. Prereq: Pre-req: EDST 451

 

EDST 456/556 Equal Opportunity: Colonization and Genocide (4) [Graded only for majors] Examines the way educational institutions have been and continue to be a part of larger social processes of colonization and cultural genocide. Prereq: Pre-req: EDST 451

 

EDST 457/557 Equal Opportunity: Diaspora and Immigration (4) [Graded only for majors] Examines the way educational institutions have responded to human migration generally and to immigrant students specifically. Prereq: Pre-req: EDST 451

 

EDST 459 Observation: Stratified Society (1) [Graded only for majors] Engages students in the analysis of educational opportunity in the field. Prereq: Co-req: EDST 451

 

EDST 461/561 Literacy Across the Curriculum (4) [Graded only for majors] Examines the way various forms of literacy mediate all learning processes, from learning to read, to learning academic content, to literacy in the workplace.

 

EDST 462/562 Interventions for the Struggling Reader (4) [Graded only for majors] Focus on prevention efforts and interventions for students who are struggling as readers.

 

EDST 611 The Scholarship of Teaching (4) [Graded only for majors] Examines the recent emergence of a focus on teachers as reflective practitioners, inquirers, action researchers, and scholars of pedagogical understanding.

 

EDST 612 Foundations of Teaching and Learning (4) [Graded only for majors] Provides students with the psychological foundations of teaching and learning.

 

EDST 613 Motivation and Management (4) [Graded only for majors] Focus on the inextricable relationship between assumptions about human motivation and classroom management practices.

 

EDST 614 Cultural Context of Education (4) [Graded only for majors] Examine the cultural foundations of educational practice through a critical review of four decades of ethnographic research on school culture and student culture.

 

EDST 615 Critical Studies: Technology and Education (4) [Graded only for majors] An introduction to major contemporary issues impacting education in the digital age.

 

EDST 616 Language, Power and Education (4) [Graded only for majors] Examine the politics, policies and practical realities associated with language and literacy in educational settings and how these issues affect all students to some degree.

 

EDST 617 Serving the English Language Learner (4) [Graded only for majors] Historical, demographic, political and legal perspectives related to the education of children who come to school speaking a native language other than English.

 

EDST 620 Evolution and the Math Wars (4) [Graded only for majors] Focus on debates that influence, and in some cases overshadow, the teaching of mathematics and science in K-12 Sequence: (EDST 621, EDST 622) or (EDST 623, EDST 624), EDST 625, EDST 626

 

EDST 621 Representing Mathematical Concepts (4) [Graded only for majors] Students will deepen their content knowledge, widen their understanding of student conceptualizations of mathematics and reflect on their own mathematics instructional practices. Sequence: EDST 620, EDST 622, EDST 625, EDST 626

 

EDST 622 Mathematical Problem Solving Curriculum (4) [Graded only for majors] Prepares students to view mathematics as a field of problem-solving, rather than a set of discrete skills and operational rules. Sequence: EDST 620, EDST 621, EDST 625, EDST 626 Prereq: Pre-req: EDST 621

 

EDST 623 Critical Teaching: Representing Science Concepts (4) [Graded only for majors] Examine why we teach science, and what we need to teach in science, and how science is learned. Sequence: EDST 620, EDST 624, EDST 625, EDST 626

 

EDST 624 Scientific Problem Solving Curriculum (4) [Graded only for majors] Presents science as a field of problem-solving, rather than a set of discrete facts and concepts. Introduces scientific literacy as the aim of science teaching. Sequence: EDST 620, EDST 623, EDST 625, EDST 626 Prereq: Pre-req: EDST 623

 

EDST 625 Serving Diverse Learners in Math/Science (4) [Graded only for majors] Examine the research and practices that support an inclusive and culturally responsive approach to mathematics and science education. Sequence: EDST 620, (EDST 621 and EDST 622) or (EDST 623 and EDST 624), EDST 626 Prereq: Pre-req: EDST 622 or EDST 624

 

EDST 626 ESOL Pedagogy for Math/Science (4) [Graded only for majors] Examine a variety of research-based instructional and assessment strategies that support English Language Learners to meet curricular mandates of mainstream Mathematics and Science classrooms. Sequence: EDST 620, (EDST 621 and EDST 622) or (EDST 623 and EDST 624), EDST 625 Prereq: Pre-req: EDST 622 or EDST 624

 

EDST 630 Humanities Curriculum: Truth, Beauty, Fluency (4) [Graded only for majors] Examine the epistemology and conceptions of education that underlie humanities curriculum at the secondary level. Sequence: (EDST 631 and EDST 632) or (EDST 633 and EDST 634) or (EDST 635 and EDST 636), EDST 637, EDST 638

 

EDST 631 Representing Literature to Young People (4) [Graded only for majors] Examine why we teach literature and the way teachers represent literary works to students. Sequence: EDST 630, EDST 632, EDST 637, EDST 638

 

EDST 632 Engaging Students in Writing (4) [Graded only for majors] Overview of strategies and tools for engaging students in the writing process. Empahsis on genres of writing and use of technology to enhance student writing. Sequence: EDST 630, EDST 631, EDST 637, EDST 638 Prereq: Pre-req: EDST 631

 

EDST 633 Representing Second Language Concepts (4) [Graded only for majors] Provides a research-based foundation for planning, teaching, assessing and managing second language learning for the diversity of students encountered in middle and high shcool contexts. Sequence: EDST 630, EDST 634, EDST 637, EDST 638

 

EDST 634 Second Language Conversation and Composition (4) [Graded only for majors] Learn a variety of advanced teaching methodologies, techniques and skills that effectively promote proficiency and fluency in second languages. Sequence: EDST 630, EDST 633, EDST 637, EDST 638 Prereq: Pre-req: EDST 633

 

EDST 635 Representing Social Studies Concepts (4) [Graded only for majors] Examine why we teach social studies and the way teachers represent social studies concepts to students. Sequence: EDST 630, EDST 636, EDST 637, EDST 638

 

EDST 636 Social Studies Inquiry and Analysis (4) [Graded only for majors] Explore the theory and practice of teaching social studies as a specialized form of inquiry. Sequence: EDST 630, EDST 635, EDST 637, EDST 638 Prereq: Pre-req: EDST 635

 

EDST 637 Serving Diverse Learners in Humanities (4) [Graded only for majors] Theory about and practical strategies for working with culturally, linguistically and academically diverse learners. Sequence: EDST 630, (EDST 631 and EDST 632) or (EDST 633 and EDST 634) or (EDST 635 and EDST 636), EDST 638 Prereq: EDST 632 or EDST 634 or EDST 636


 

EDST 638 ESOL Pedagogy for Humanities (4) [Graded only for majors] A variety of research-based instructional and assessment strategies that support English Language Learners to meet curricular mandates of mainstream Language Arts and Social Studies classrooms. Sequence: EDST 630, (EDST 631 and EDST 632) or (EDST 633 and EDST 634) or (EDST 635 and EDST 636), EDST 637 Prereq: Pre-req: EDST 632 or EDST 634 or EDST 636

 

EDST 640 Constructing Meaning Through Literacy (4) [Graded only for majors] Provides concepts lenses and strategies used in teaching children to read. Course focuses in particular on instruction for beginning and intermediate readers and writers. Sequence: EDST 641

 

EDST 641 Reading as a Cultural Practice (4) [Graded only for majors] Examine the teaching of reading as a practice infused with cultural meaning, placing reading education in its wider social and cultural context. Sequence: EDST 640 Prereq: Pre-req: EDST 640

 

EDST 642 Pedagogical Methods in the Humanities (4) [Graded only for majors] Explore the application of language arts and social studies methods and strategies for future elementary school practitioners.

 

EDST 643 Teaching Mathematics: Facts and Inquiry (4) [Graded only for majors] Focus directly on four areas of teachers’ work crucial to becoming a skillful beginning teacher of mathematics. Sequence: EDST 644

 

EDST 644 Teaching Mathematics: Inquiry in Context (4) [Graded only for majors] An in-depth investigation of techniques and strategies used to effectively teach and assess math to all students. Sequence: EDST 643 Prereq: Pre-req: EDST 643

 

EDST 645 Teaching Science: Detail and Discovery (4) [Graded only for majors] Empahsizes science as a process of thinking about, questioning and exploring our world in elementary classrooms.

 

EDST 646 ESOL Pedagogy for Elementary Classrooms (4) [Graded only for majors] Examines a variety of research-based instructional and assessment strategies that support English Language Learners to meet curricular mandates of mainstream classrooms. Prereq: Pre-req: EDST 641

 

EDST 650 Teacher Education: Policy and Practice (4) [Graded only for majors] Explore the work of contemporary scholars who are attempting to bridge the policy and practice divide in teacher education. Offered alternate years.

 

EDST 651 Teacher Knowledge: Practical, Personal, Professional (4) [Graded only for majors] A critical survey of contemporary theories about the nature and content of the knowledge that enables teaching competence. Offered alternate years.

 

EDST 652 Teacher Education: Analyzing Foundational Concepts (4) [Graded only for majors] Examine foundational concepts that shape both our research and practice in teacher education. Offered alternate years.

 

EDST 654 Learning and Motivational Sciences (4) [Graded only for majors] A survey of the learning and motivational sciences for advanced graduate students. Offered alternate years.

 

EDST 655 Creativity and Conformity in Classrooms (4) [Graded only for majors] Focus on the role that creativity and imagination play in teaching, learning and meaning making. Offered alternate years.

 

EDST 656 Science and Mathematics Learning (4) [Graded only for majors] Examine the social, political, cultural, psychological and discipline-based explanations for the obstacles that students face when studying mathematics and the sciences. Offered alternate years.

 

EDST 657 Nature, Nurture and Schooling (4) [Graded only for majors] Examine the social, political, cultural, psychological and discipline-based explanations for the obstacles that students face in elementary schools. Offered alternate years.

 


 

EDST 660 Urban Schools: History and Politics (4) [Graded only for majors] Examine the historical, economic, political, legal, and social context of contemporary urban schooling systems. Offered alternate years.

 

EDST 661 Educational Sociology: Reproduction to Resistance (4) [Graded only for majors] Focuses on the ways in which schools reproduce, reinforce, and challenge prevailing social, economic and political relationships. Offered alternate years.

 

EDST 662 Curriculum Theory: Contesting Educational Content (4) [Graded only for majors] A critical survey of the history of curriculum theory, the subfield that asks the fundamental question: what is worth teaching? Offered alternate years.

 

EDST 663 Fronteras Pedagógicas: Education and Immigration (4) [Graded only for majors] Critically examines the way educational institutions have responded to human migration generally and to immigrant students, with an emphasis on bilingual education policy. Offered alternate years.

 

EDST 666 Thesis Writing: Taming the Beast (4R) [Graded only for majors] Graduate seminar for doctoral students who have been advanced to candidacy. Emphasis is on support through the dissertation proposal writing process. R As needed

 

EDST 667 Grant Writing: Finding Funders (4) [Graded only for majors] Seminar designed to provide graduate students with the knowledge and skills needed to write successful grant proposals for research, professional development and curriculum development projects.

 

EDST 670 Philosophy of Research (4) [Graded only for majors] Examines the philosophical assumptions that underlie various research methodologies in the human and social sciences.

 

EDST 671 Qualitative Methodology I: Interpretive Inquiry (4) [Graded only for majors] Examine the history, philosophy and some basic applications of naturalistic research methods in the study of human experience.

 

EDST 672 Qualitative Methodology II: Reflexive Inquiry (4) [Graded only for majors] Examines the epistemic limits of any method of representing human experience and the political and ethical implications of those limits for researchers.

 

EDST 673 Qualitative Methodology III: Transformative Inquiry (4) [Graded only for majors] Explores the ethics and aesthetics of naturalistic studies of human experience and surveys the latest innovations in qualitative social science methodology.

 

School of Music and Dance

 

EXISTING COURSE CHANGES

 

MUS 443/543 Electronic Music Techniques I (4)

(Changed Course Description, Course Title, Repeatability)

MUS 443/543 Digital Audio and Sound Design (4R) Examines concepts of digital audio representation, sampling, and processing; considers audio mixing, basic synthesis, and sound modification techniques and fundamentals of electroacoustic composition. Clarification from the department is required.

 

MUS 444/544 Electronic Music Techniques II (3)

(Changed Course Description, Course Title, Repeatability)

MUS 444/544 Interactive Media Performance (3R) Examines concepts of interactive performance using MIDI, digital audio, and video processing, and considers issues related to designing performance algorithms in software. Clarification from the department is required.

 

 

 

 

WITHDRAWN PROPOSALS

 

CAS-History

 

HIST 423/523 Gender in European History: [Topic] (4R) [Graded only for majors] Range of topics include witches and witchcraft; men, women and revolution; sex and sexual difference in premodern Europe; and medieval religious women. DENIED the request to satisfy Category B: Identity, Pluralism, and Tolerance multicultural requirement. The department has withdrawn the proposal.

 

aAA-ART

 

ARTC 450/550 Factory (4-6R) Utilizing industrial processes, participants will adopt the aesthetics and dynamics of commodity culture in order to engage product design within a contemporary art practice based upon inquiry. Collaboration, with fellow students or faculty, and with outside businesses and organizations is encouraged. The department has withdrawn the proposal.

 

Physical Activity and Recreation Services

 

PEOL 352 Backpacking II Outing (1)

(Changed Course Title)

PEOL 352 Backcountry Navigation (1) The department has withdrawn the proposal.

 

DROPPED COURSES

 

The University Senate agreed in 1998 that the report of the Committee on Courses should include those permanently numbered courses that are being dropped because (1) they have not been taught for three or more years, and (2) the department can provide no reasonable explanation why they have not been taught or whether they will be in the future. The faculty requires that general-education–satisfying courses be offered each year. Other courses should be offered at least every other year to avoid misrepresentation of course offerings to prospective students, and ensure that required courses are readily available to current students.

Courses may be reinstated within a period of three years, conditional upon the following: (a) there has been no change made to the course, (b) the department provides the term the course will be taught, (c) the department provides the name of the faculty member who will be responsible for teaching, and (d) the department provides a course syllabus with information regarding undergraduate-graduate differential for demonstrating mastery if the course is numbered 4xx/5xx.

By action of the Committee on Courses, the following courses are removed from the curriculum:

 

Arts and Administration                                               

AAD 611                         Masters Degree Project; last offered: fall 2004

                                                                 

Anthropology                                             

ANTH 252                       Human Impacts on Ancient Environments; never taught

ANTH 350                       Ancient Mesoamerica; never taught

ANTH 360                       Human Ecology; last offered winter: 2004

ANTH 452                       Postcolonialism and Globalization: [Topic]; last offered: winter 2004

ANTH 465                       Gender Issues in Nutritional Anthropology; last offered: winter 2004

ANTH 473                       Paleoanthropology of South Asia; last offered: fall 2003

ANTH 552                       Postcolonialism and Globalization: [Topic]; last offered: winter 2004

ANTH 565                       Gender Issues in Nutritional Anthropology; last offered: winter 2004

ANTH 573                       Paleoanthropology of South Asia; last offered: fall 2003

 

 

ANTH 620                       Anthropolgy and History; never taught

ANTH 687                       Approaches in Social Anthropology; never taught

                                                                 

Architecture                                                

ARCH 493                       Solar Heating; last offered: fall 2002

ARCH 593                       Solar Heating; last offered: fall 2002

                                                                 

Art History                                                 

ARH 396                         Japanese Art III; last offered: spring 2004

ARH 449                         Baroque Architecture; last offered: winter 2004

ARH 484                         Problems in Chinese Art: [Topic]; last offered: spring 2004

ARH 549                         Baroque Architecture; last offered: winter 2004

ARH 584                         Problems in Chinese Art: [Topic]; last offered: spring 2004

                                                                 

Art                                                             

ART 414                          Art and Creativity; last offered: winter 2004

ART 514                          Art and Creativity; last offered: winter 2004

ARTD 473                       3-D Computer Animation Production; last offered: spring 2004

ARTD 480                       Design Direction; last offered: fall 2003

ARTD 573                       3-D Computer Animation Production; last offered: spring 2004

ARTD 580                       Design Direction; last offered: fall 2003

ARTR 549                       Lithography; last offered: fall 2001

ARTS 494                        Advanced Sculpture; last offered: spring 2004

ARTS 594                        Advanced Sculpture; last offered: spring 2004

                                                                 

Business Administration                              

BA 452                            Business Leadership; last offered: spring 2004

BA 452H                         Business Leadership; last offered: winter 2004

                                                                 

Biology                                                      

BI 354                             Vertebrate Form and Function; last offered: fall 2003

BI 463                             Cellular Neuroscience; last offered: fall 2003

BI 563                             Cellular Neuroscience; last offered: fall 2003

                                                                 

Communication and Disorder Sciences                                                                                    

CDS 669                          Congenital Syndromes; never taught

                                                                 

Chemistry                                                   

CH 614                            Physical Chem: Topic; last offered: fall 2003

                                                                 

Comparative Literature                                

COLT 414                        Enlighten: Topic; last offered: fall 2002

COLT 479                        Literature and Testimony; last offered: spring 2004

COLT 514                        Enlighten: Topic; last offered: fall 2002

COLT 579                        Literature and Testimony; last offered: spring 2004

                                                                 

Counseling Psychology                                

CPSY 624                        Alcohol and Drug Detection and Intervention; never taught

                                                                 

Decision Sciences                                         

DSC 455                          Production Systems Analysis; last offered: winter 2004

DSC 555                          Production Systems Analysis; last offered: winter 2004

 

Educational Studies                                    

EDST 545                        Early Language, Reading, and Literacy; last offered: fall 2003

                                                                 

Environmental Science                                

ENVS 535                        Environmental Justice; last offered: winter 2004

                                                                 

Family and Human Services                                                                                                

FHS 481                          Prevention of Alcohol and Drug Addiction; last offered: fall 2003

FHS 581                          Prevention of Alcohol and Drug Addiction; last offered: fall 2003

                                                                 

Geography                                                 

GEOG 204                       Geography of Russia and Neighbors; last offered: spring 2004

GEOG 651                       Advanced Paleoecology: [Topic]; last offered: fall 2003

                                                                 

Geological Sciences                                      

GEOL 434                        Vertebrate Paleontology; last offered: winter 2004

GEOL 534                        Vertebrate Paleontology; last offered: winter 2004

                                                                 

History                                                       

HIST 365                         Worlds of Childhood; last offered: winter 2004

HIST 472                         American Masculinities; last offered: winter 2004

HIST 499                         Japanese Popular Culture: [Topic]; last offered: fall 2003

HIST 572                         American Masculinities; last offered: winter 2004

HIST 599                         Japanese Popular Culture: [Topic]; last offered: winter 2001

                                                                 

Human Physiology                                      

HPHY 463                       Sports Nutrition; never taught

HPHY 563                       Sports Nutrition; never taught

HPHY 674                       Clinical and Functional Anatomy; never taught

HPHY 677                       Biochemical Principles of Exercise; never taught

                                                                 

Humanities                                                 

HUM 354                         Modern Culture: Topic; last offered: fall 2003

                                                                 

Interior Architecture                                    

IARC 417                        Context of the Interior Architectural Profession; last offered: fall 2003

IARC 517                        Context of the Interior Architectural Profession; last offered: fall 2003

                                                                 

Journalism                                                 

J 332                               TV Studio Production; last offered: fall 2003

J 481                               Newsletter Publication; last offered: winter 2004

J 581                               Newsletter Publication; last offered: winter 2004

J 650                               Advertising as a Social Institution; last offered: fall 2003

                                                                 

Landscape Architecture                               

LA 389                            Landscape Architectural Design; last offered: fall 2003

LA 411                            Oregon Landscape Planning; last offered: winter 1998

LA 414                            Open Space Planning; last offered: winter 2004

LA 431                            Planting Design Theory; last offered: winter 2004

LA 480                            Landscape Preservation; last offered: winter 2004

LA 511                            Oregon Landscape Planning; last offered: winter 1998

LA 514                            Open Space Planning; last offered: winter 2004

LA 531                            Planting Design Theory; last offered: winter 2004

LA 580                            Landscape Preservation; last offered: winter 2004

LA 693                            Advanced Landscape Design Theory; last offered: winter 2004

                                                                 

 

 

 

 

Library                                                      

LIB 463                           Internet Information and Culture; last offered: spring 2004

LIB 563                           Internet Information and Culture; last offered: spring 2004

 

Mathematics                                               

MATH 451                       Introduction to Numerical Analysis I; last offered: fall 2003

MATH 551                       Introduction to Numerical Analysis I; last offered: fall 2003

                                                                 

Marriage and Family Therapy                                                                                             

MFT 622                         Stress and Family Crisis; last offered: winter 2003

                                                                 

Marketing                                                  

MKTG 662                       Marketing Communications; last offered: winter 2004

MKTG 688                       Theory and Research in Marketing Information; last offered: spring 2004

                                                                 

Middle-Secondary Teaching                                                                                                 

MSEC 618                       Technology in Middle-Secondary Schools; last offered: fall 2003

MSEC                             642       Middle-Secondary Continuing License; last offered: winter 2004

                                                                 

Overseas Studies                                         

OLON 688                       Overseas Studies: London, NCSA Program; never taught

OROM 188                      Overseas Studies: Rome, Summer Architecture Studio; never taught

OROM 288                      Overseas Studies: Rome, Summer Architecture Studio; never taught

OROM 388                      Overseas Studies: Rome, Summer Architecture Studio; never taught

OSEV 188                        Overseas Studies: Seville, Study in Spain; never taught

OSEV 288                        Overseas Studies: Seville, Study in Spain; never taught

OSEV 388                        Overseas Studies: Seville, Study in Spain; last offered: spring 2003

OSEV 488                        Overseas Studies: Seville, Study in Spain; last offered: spring 2003

OSEV 688                        Overseas Studies: Seville, Study in Spain; never taught

OSIE 688                         Overseas Studies: Siena, NCSA Program; never taught

OSIP 688                         Overseas Studies: Baden-Wurttemberg, Spring Intensive Program; never taught

                                                                 

Physical Education                                     

PEAS 371                        Scuba: Underwater Navigator; last offered: spring 2004

PEAS 375                        Scuba: Deep Diver; last offered: spring 2004

PEMA 225                       Hapkido; last offered: spring 2004

PEMA 246                       Wrestling I; last offered: spring 2004

PEMA 247                       Wrestling II; last offered: spring 2004

PEMA 248                       Wrestling III; last offered: spring 2004

PEMA 252                       Tae Kwon Do II; last offered: spring 2004

PEOL 354                        Backpacking III Outing; last offered: fall 2003

PEOL 367                        Glacier Rig and Rescue Outing; last offered: fall 2003

PETS 235                        Grass Volleyball; last offered: 200304

                                                                 

Philosophy                                                 

PHIL 321                         Theory of Knowledge; last offered: fall 2003

PHIL 444                         Feminist Ethics; last offered: winter 2004

PHIL 458                         Philosophy of Mind; last offered: fall 2003

                                                                 

Physics                                                       

PHYS 513                        Mechanics, Electricity, and Magnetism; last offered: winter 2004

PHYS 514                        Quantum Physics; last offered: fall 2003

PHYS 522                        Electromagnetism; last offered: spring 2004

PHYS 676                        Theory Condensed Matter; last offered: spring 2004

                                                                 

 

 

Planning, Public Policy and Management                                                                               

PPPM 203                       Sustainable Environment; never taught

PPPM 621                       Environmental Analysis; last offered: winter 2004

 

Political Science                                          

PS 439                            Evolution, Cooperation, Ethics; last offered: spring 2004

PS 442                            Politics of China II; last offered: spring 2004

PS 539                            Evolution, Cooperation, Ethics; last offered: spring 2004

PS 542                            Politics of China II; last offered: spring 2004

                                                                 

Religious Studies                                        

REL 332                          Islamic Civilization; last offered: fall 2003

                                                                 

Russian                                                      

RUSS 241                        Great Russian Writers; last offered: spring 2004

RUSS 301                        Readings Russian Literature; last offered: winter 2004

RUSS 432                        Russian Prose Classics: [Topic]; last offered: 200203

RUSS 532                        Russian Prose Classics: [Topic]; last offered: 200203

                                                                 

Sports Business                                          

SBUS 451                        Sports Marketing Communication; never taught

                                                                 

Spanish                                                     

SPAN 538                        Spanish Romantic Poetry; last offered: winter 2004

                                                                 

Theater Arts                                               

TA 440                            Principles of Design in the Theater; last offered: spring 2004

TA 540                            Principles of Design in the Theater; last offered: spring 2004

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

SUBMITTING COURSE PROPOSALS

The Committee on Courses offers the following reminders:

 

ü      Proposals to the Committee on Courses must be submitted on electronic forms, available on the CAS website, http://uocurriculum.uoregon.edu/. Arrangements for access may be made by contacting the appropriate college curriculum coordinator for each individual professional school or college. Proposals submitted on old forms will be returned, without review, to academic departments, schools, or colleges. Proposals must be submitted to the Committee on Courses prior to the beginning of the term in which they are to be considered. Proposals received after the beginning of the term will be deferred to the following term. All departments should consult their college curriculum coordinator for deadline dates or go to http://uocurriculum.uoregon.edu/ and click the “Important Dates” link.

ü     The following minor course changes may be made without review by the full committee: minor edits of course description, pre- or co-requisites, grading option, and conditions of repeatability. Changes may be submitted in writing directly to the Offices of the Registrar and Creative Publishing, in care of Mike Jefferis (jefferis@uoregon.edu) and Scott Skelton (sskelton@pages.uoregon.edu), respectively. The memorandum should indicate the effective term for the change(s). Note: extensive changes may be referred to the UOCC for review.

ü     If there is any question that a proposed new or changed course might duplicate coverage in an existing course from another department or school, the proposing department must gain written confirmation that the other department has been consulted and does not object to the new or changed course.

ü     Proposals for new courses must be accompanied by full syllabi.

ü     For 4xx/5xx level courses, both proposal forms and syllabi must state explicitly the substantive and measurable differences in type and amount of work for the two levels.

ü     The minimal requirements for general-education status of a course are regarded as necessary, but not always sufficient, for inclusion of a course as part of a comprehensive general-education program at the university.

Group satisfying courses are intended to provide students with a cohesive general-education program. Proposals for group-satisfying status of a course should explain how the course enhances general-education at the university, explicitly stating how the course would complement other group-satisfying courses, and which other courses would be especially suitable for students to take in accompaniment. Approved March 10, 2004.

According to University Senate legislation, courses submitted for group-satisfying status must be submitted to the Intercollege General-education Review Committee.

Proposals for undergraduate group-satisfying and multicultural courses must include written justification, regardless of whether they are new or existing courses.

ü     The minimal requirements for multicultural status of a course are regarded as sufficient for inclusion of a course as part of the multicultural course requirements.

Any course that might appear to satisfy the university multicultural requirements, either by title, description, or content, is carefully examined to see if it should be listed as a multicultural course. If a course might appear on its face eligible for multicultural status, the committee needs clear explanation of why the course does—or does not—satisfy multicultural course guidelines. Arbitrary exclusion of courses from the list of multicultural satisfying courses can engender student confusion or cynicism. Approved on March 10, 2004.

ü     The UO Committee on Courses has established the policy that the phrase “or instructor’s consent” will not be stated along with any other course prerequisites. The prerequisites of any course may be overridden by instructor’s consent, and need not be stated explicitly for individual courses. Academic departments are able to override any prerequisite requirements in Banner should a student qualify to enroll.

“Instructor’s consent” is reserved for use alone as a sole prerequisite to allow departments to monitor suitability of enrollment in courses for individual students, preventing enrollment without prior approval. Academic departments should be aware they must code the courses correctly and assume enrollment management responsibilities, preauthorizing each student individually, with this option. Approved March 10, 2004.


CONTENTS OF COURSE SYLLABUS

 

As the primary, commonly available summary of a course, the syllabus serves several purposes. It outlines the course, it denotes what students may expect from the course, and it locates the course in the curriculum. The syllabus is the best, most concise description of a course by its teacher available to both prospective students and colleagues. The Committee on Courses uses syllabuses in its review of courses. To maximize the usefulness of a syllabus to students and faculty, it should contain the following contents:

 

1. Course Number

2. Title

3. Credits

4. Term, place, time, instructor

(For a new course proposal, indicate when it is likely to be offered, and how frequently)

(For a new course proposal, indicate who is likely to teach the course)

 

5. Position in the curriculum

• Satisfies group requirement? Explain why

• Satisfies multicultural requirement? Explain why

• Satisfies other general-education requirement?

• Satisfies other major or program requirement?

• Preparatory for other courses?

• List prerequisites or other suggested preparation

 

6. Format (lecture, discussion, laboratory)

 

7. Outline of subject and topics explored

 

8. Course materials (texts, books, readings)

 

9. Instructor expectations of students

• Be explicit (by pages assigned, lengths of assignments)

• Level of student engagement expected (see suggested Student Engagement Inventory on following page)

• Readings

• Problems

• Attendance

• Project

• Writing

• Laboratory

• Field work

• Work with electronic media, network, online

• Performance

• Presentation

• Exams

• Differential expected for graduate work for joint 4xx/5xx-level courses

 

10. Assessment

• Methods (testing, homework)

• Times or frequency

• Grading policy

• Incomplete policy

 

[See Faculty Handbook for other recommendations regarding university policies.]


STUDENT ENGAGEMENT INVENTORY

 

To aid in assigning student credit hours uniformly to courses in the curriculum, the committee inventories the amount of student engagement in a course. The committee has found the following tool to be useful. Departments preparing course proposals are invited to use this form when deciding how many SCH units to request for a proposed course. Departments are encouraged to report to the committee how this tool may be improved for their use.

 

Please identify the number of hours a typical or average student would expect to spend in each of the following activities. The general guideline is that each undergraduate credit should reflect thirty hours of student engagement. Therefore, a 3-credit course would engage students for ninety hours total among the activities listed below, whereas a 4-credit course would list 120 hours of activities in which students are engaged over the course of the term. (Graduate students are expected to perform work of higher quality and quantity, typically with an additional 20–25 percent effort expected.)

 

Educational activity

Hours student engaged

Explanatory comments (if any):

Course attendance

 

 

Assigned readings

 

 

Project

 

 

Writing assignments

 

 

Lab or workshop

 

 

Field work, experience

 

 

Online interaction

 

 

Performances, creative activities

 

 

Total hours:

 

 

 

Definition of terms:

Course attendance

Actual time student spends in class with instructor or GTF

Assigned readings

Estimated time it takes for a student with average reading ability to read all assigned readings

Writing assignments

Estimated time it takes for a student with average writing ability to produce a final, acceptable written product as required by the assignment

Project

Estimated time a student would be expected to spend creating or contributing to a project that meets course requirements (includes individual and group projects)

Lab or workshop

Actual time scheduled for any lab or workshop activities that are required but are scheduled outside of class hours

Field work, experience

Actual or estimated time a student would spend or be expected to spend engaged in required field work or other field-based activities

Online activities

Actual or estimated time a student would spend or be expected to spend engaged in online activities directly related to the course, separate from online research required for projects or writing assignments

Performance, creative activities

Actual or estimated time a student would spend or be expected to spend outside of class hours engaged in preparing for required performance or creative activity

 


UNDERGRADUATE GENERAL-EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS

GROUP-REQUIREMENT POLICIES

 

The following criterions were proposed by the Undergraduate Council and the College of Arts and Sciences Curriculum Committee. The University Senate approved them in May 2001 by Motion US0001-3 Replacement Motion governing the approval of courses meeting general-education requirements and the distribution of courses student must complete within each group.

 

1. Group satisfying courses in Arts and Letters, Social Science, and Science must meet the following general criteria:

1.1. Group satisfying courses in arts and letters must create meaningful opportunities for students to engage actively in the modes of inquiry that define a discipline. Proposed courses must be broad in scope and demonstrably liberal in nature (that is, courses that promote open inquiry from a variety of perspectives). Though some courses may focus on specialized subjects or approaches, there must be a substantial course content locating that subject in the broader context of the major issues of the discipline. Qualifying courses will not focus on teaching basic skills but will require the application or engagement of those skills through analysis and interpretation.

1.2. Group satisfying courses in the social sciences must be liberal in nature rather than being professionally oriented or limited to the performance of professional skills. They must cover a representative cross-section of key issues, perspectives, and modes of analysis employed by scholars working on the subject matter addressed by the course. The subject matter of the course will be relatively broad, e.g. involving more than one issue, place, or time. Courses with an emphasis on methods and skills will satisfy the requirement only if there is also a substantial and coherent theoretical component.

1.3. Group satisfying courses in the sciences should introduce students to the foundations of one or more scientific disciplines, or should provide an introduction to fundamental methods (such as mathematics) that are widely used in scientific disciplines. Courses should introduce students to the process of scientific reasoning.

 

2. Specific Criteria:

2.1. Group satisfying courses must be numbered at the 100, 200, and 300 levels.

2.2. Lower division courses must be offered annually, and upper division courses at least every other year.

2.3. Approved courses must be at least 4 credits each.

2.4. Upper division group satisfying courses must provide depth and rigor beyond that of typical lower-division general-education courses. Departments must justify, in terms of content, workload, and method of instruction, the assignment of a course to the upper level.

2.5. Courses that are offered for majors only are excluded from group status, but courses that are designed for both majors and other students may qualify.

2.6. Although laboratory courses are not automatically excluded from group status in the sciences, to acquire this status, the courses must not focus primarily on techniques or data collection.

 

3. Procedures governing the approval of all courses designed to meet General-education requirements.:

3.1. Before submission to the Senate, such courses proposed by departments must be reviewed at several levels:

3.1.1. By the curricular committees of the various colleges and schools

3.1.2. By an inter-college committee including the members of the CAS Curricular Committee and two representatives appointed by the deans of the others schools and colleges. This second committee is also charged to review such courses as do not meet the standards set in paragraph (2.) and to negotiate a solution with the sponsoring department.

3.1.3. By the University Committee on Courses.

3.2. The inter college committee is authorized to establish procedures governing the review process.

4. Completion of group requirements (student progress):

4.1. Within the full set of courses that fulfills all of the requirements, students may not count

4.1.1. more than one course that has the subject code of the major, or

4.1.2. more than three courses that have the same subject code.

4.2. Within the smaller set of courses that fulfills the requirements of each group, students must complete at least two courses that have the same subject code.


 

SUSTAINABLE COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

The 2000–2001 academic year was the first year that the Committee on Courses systematically deleted from the university catalog courses that have not been taught for three years or more.

 

In several cases, departments had not offered a specialized course under a course number and title specified in the catalog. Yet similar courses had been taught regularly in the department in various formats, under experimental numbers (410, 510, 610), or under the general designations for special topics seminars, workshops, or practicums (the 406/407/408/409, 506/507/508/509, 606/607/608/609 series). With time, departments had discovered that a course description in the catalog was too specialized to apply to any of their courses as actually being taught.

 

Unfortunately, removal of an overly specialized course, although untaught, still might have consequences for departments. Often that course had been the sole representative in the catalog of subjects that are taught by a department and are part of the regular curriculum. Dropping that course could make it appear that a department offered no courses in that course’s subject area.

 

The committee has noted another, companion problem. Over the years, the committee has observed that new courses tailored to the particular research interests and instructional style of an individual faculty member are likely to fall into disuse within a few years as the person’s teaching assignments and interests change, or if the instructor becomes unavailable for teaching that particular course.

 

The Committee on Courses recommends that departments and programs develop more sustainable course descriptions. A sustainable course description would identify a subject area and general approach, but would not be so restrictive as to exclude different perspectives or specializations also representative of that subject area.

 

The committee also recommends that departments and programs be selective when proposing permanent course status for specialized courses that can only be taught by one particular instructor.

 

For example, a department with several experts qualified to teach ceramics, but having only one instructor who specializes in Ming porcelain per se, might currently have a specialized course titled Ming Dynasty Porcelains in the catalog. A more sustainable course title could be Chinese Porcelains or even Porcelains, depending upon the range of expertise available to teach the course. Another approach would use the topics course Ceramics, possibly repeatable as the exact subject material—and transcript title—changes.

 

Departments following these recommendations could then represent the full range of their curricular offerings and could maintain a sustainable list of courses in the catalog.

 

MULTICULTURAL-CATEGORY DEFINITIONS

 

Category A: American Cultures. The goal is to focus on race and ethnicity in the United States by considering racial and ethnic groups from historical and comparative perspectives. Five racial or ethnic groups are identified: African American, Chicano or Latino, Native American, Asian American, European American. Approved courses deal with at least two of these groups in a comparative manner. They do not necessarily deal specifically with discrimination or prejudice, although many do.

 

Category B: Identity, Pluralism, and Tolerance. The goal is to gain scholarly insight into the construction of collective identities, the emergence of representative voices from varying social and cultural standpoints, and the effects of prejudice, intolerance, and discrimination. The identities at issue may include ethnicities as in the American Cultures category, as well as classes, genders, religions, sexual orientations, or other groups whose experiences contribute to cultural pluralism. This category includes courses that analyze the general principles underlying tolerance, or the lack of it.

 

Category C: International Cultures. The goal is to study world cultures in critical perspective. Approved courses either treat an international culture in view of the issues raised in Categories A and B (namely, race and ethnicity, pluralism and monoculturalism, prejudice and tolerance) or explicitly describe and analyze a worldview (i.e., a system of knowledge, feeling, and belief) that is substantially different from those prevalent in the twentieth-century United States.

 

CRITERIA FOR ADDING AN “H” SUFFIX TO A COURSE NUMBER

 

The Committee on Courses has discussed the criteria for adding an “H” suffix to a course number and recommends the following:

 

The “H” suffix is intended to advise students that a course provides honors content of significant difficulty and requires honors effort from students. The Committee on Courses will be looking for evidence of the following in determining whether a course should hold an “H” suffix designation:

 

1.   Students enrolling should have a cumulative GPA of at least 3.30 in their major.

 

  1. The content of the class, and the level of analysis, should be significantly deeper than for nonhonors classes.

 

  1. Class size should be small enough to promote intensive student participation.

 

  1. The faculty member(s) teaching the course should be available for close advising outside of class.

 

SUGGESTIONS FOR REVISING DEFINITIONS OF

UNDERGRADUATE MAJORS, MINORS, CERTIFICATES

MAJOR

 

Definition

Courses in designated primary subject areas or disciplines in which a student commits to gaining in-depth knowledge, skills, competence, and attitudes through a coherent pattern of courses. A footnote accompanies the major definition: Divisional major programs emphasize a general and integrated approach to learning, with the student’s major program broadly inclusive of work in several of the discipline or subject areas within the specific division within which the student’s degree program lies (i.e., humanities, social science, science). For instance, a divisional major program in the social sciences would call for the student to include within his or her major work from several of the disciplines or subject areas in the social sciences (such as sociology, political science, or economics). Because of the breadth of disciplines or subjects included in the major, the student has less opportunity to delve in depth into a single subject area such as sociology, political science, or economics, than they would be able to do were they in a “departmental major” program in a single one of these disciplines or subject areas.

 

Minimal Requirements

36 credits, of which a minimum of 24 must be upper division. Departments should consider setting minimum residency requirements.

 

MINOR

Definition

Courses in a designated secondary subject area or discipline distinct from and usually outside the student’s degree major in which knowledge is gained in a coherent pattern of courses.

 

Minimal Requirements

24 credits, of which a minimum of 12 must be upper division. Should be within a discipline that already has a preexisting major or is sponsored by a department.

 


CERTIFICATE

 

Definition

An approved academic award given in conjunction with the satisfactory completion of a program of instruction requiring one year or more, but less than four years, of full-time equivalent, postsecondary-level work. The conditions and conferral of the award are governed by the faculty and ratified by the governing board of the institution granting the certificate.

 

Minimal Requirements

36 credits—24 upper division with 12 minimum at 400 level. The sponsoring department must provide guidance—a template or check list and the name of an adviser, with notice that the student must consult an adviser to apply for the certificate at least two terms prior to graduation.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Web page spun on 15 May 2007 by Peter B Gilkey 202 Deady Hall, Department of Mathematics at the University of Oregon, Eugene OR 97403-1222, U.S.A. Phone 1-541-346-4717 Email:peter.gilkey.cc.67@aya.yale.edu of Deady Spider Enterprises
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